[Msa-discuss] bells in modernism

Ladd, Barbara bladd at emory.edu
Sat Sep 24 13:25:28 EDT 2011


Well, there is Dorothy Sayers's treatment in The Nine Tailors: Changes Rung on an Old Theme in Two Short Touches and Two Full Peals.  (If you want to consider someone like Sayers.)

In World War I, the Germans melted down churchbells in captured areas for arms. And (you may know this already) there was a practice of inscribing mottoes on churchbells and naming them. When they were seized and melted, there was, understandably, a lot of outrage. After the war, there were efforts to locate and return bells to the communities from which they'd been taken. Sayers's novel deals with World War I, churchbells, the mottoes, etc. etc.

All this I ran into while researching William Faulkner's novel A Fable. Fascinating history.

Barbara


Barbara Ladd
Professor of English
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia 30322
tel: 404 727-7998
fax: 404 727-2605
________________________________________
From: msa-discuss-bounces at muse.jhu.edu [msa-discuss-bounces at muse.jhu.edu] on behalf of Wallace, Jo-Ann [jo-ann.wallace at ualberta.ca]
Sent: 24 September 2011 12:46 PM
To: agregor at uvic.ca; Emma Stanford
Cc: msa-discuss at jhupress.jhu.edu
Subject: Re: [Msa-discuss] bells in modernism

Obviously Woolf's _Mrs. Dalloway_ in which the bells of various churches and clock towers keep time throughout.
Cheers,
Jo-Ann

Jo-Ann Wallace
Professor, English and Film Studies
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E5
Canada
________________________________________
From: msa-discuss-bounces at muse.jhu.edu [msa-discuss-bounces at muse.jhu.edu] On Behalf Of agregor at uvic.ca [agregor at uvic.ca]
Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2011 10:17 AM
To: Emma Stanford
Cc: msa-discuss at jhupress.jhu.edu
Subject: Re: [Msa-discuss] bells in modernism

Hi Emma,

My suggestion about Plath's _The Bell Jar_ is not as obvious as it sounds.
First, it would mean that Plath is a modernist, and so you'd join the
group that feels that modernism is more a mode than a period; second, that
Plath is English either because she lived out there for a long time, or
because her work seems distinctly British (perhaps in its formality, form,
and intertextuality); finally, that any work in English is English or
Englishes, if your main topic is a trope, symbol, or specific allusion,
and therefore get some radically diverse productions around that topic if
you go transnational.

On a more traditional, but still painfully obvious, note: Eliot, "time and
the bell have buried the day" (Wasteland or 4 Quartets); and "hurry up now
it's time" (Wasteland; the "last call" bell in pubs in Britain); Woolf,
the Big Ben scene in Dalloway.

I'd suggest looking up "bell" in a Bible concordance (the King James is
English, right?). That might help with the Eliot. I'm often surprised at
what that concordance leads to; there is life beyond Eliot although I have
yet to experience it myself.

AG


> Can anyone suggest works--English modernist poetry or prose--that feature
> bells as object or symbol? Thanks.
> Emma Stanford
> Middlebury College
> _______________________________________________
> Msa-discuss mailing list
> Msa-discuss at chaos.press.jhu.edu
> http://chaos.press.jhu.edu/mailman/listinfo/msa-discuss
>


AG

Ava Gregorian
Department of English
University of Victoria
PO Box 3070 STN CSC
Victoria BC V8W 3W1
(250) 589-9946


_______________________________________________
Msa-discuss mailing list
Msa-discuss at chaos.press.jhu.edu
http://chaos.press.jhu.edu/mailman/listinfo/msa-discuss


_______________________________________________
Msa-discuss mailing list
Msa-discuss at chaos.press.jhu.edu
http://chaos.press.jhu.edu/mailman/listinfo/msa-discuss

________________________________

This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged
information. If the reader of this message is not the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution
or copying of this message (including any attachments) is strictly
prohibited.

If you have received this message in error, please contact
the sender by reply e-mail message and destroy all copies of the
original message (including attachments).
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://chaos.press.jhu.edu/pipermail/msa-discuss/attachments/20110924/cd73994a/attachment-0001.html 


More information about the Msa-discuss mailing list